Tag Archives: scone

Of Scones and Mills and Shopping Malls and Burgers, Chips and Things…

We went to Hobbycraft after I posted this morning. Julia went to do whatever she does in there and I sat in the car, thinking and photographing and making notes. Green’s Windmill was working so I took a few photos, then decided to take a video. At that point they stopped the mill. Typical.

There was a lot of clutter in the photo so I’ve decided to say that it is meant to represent the Mill in its modern urban setting. What it actually represents is my reluctance to get out of the car and walk around the car park to find a place where I could get a clear shot.

Julia emerged from the shop with bulging bags and we went for an early lunch at Burger King. It was quite pleasant, though I did cough a bit when they asked me an extra 20 pence for barbecue sauce. We won’t be going to Burger King again for a while.

This is probably a good thing, because we shouldn’t be eating junk food.

I won’t complain but I am going to make a note in my diary to write to them in six months and tell them how much money they lost for the sake of 20 pence.

We then went to the shopping outlet just off the M1 in Derbyshire. It’s gradually declined over the years. If you want cheap young person fashions, expensive coffee, shiny kitchen ware or an overpriced watch this is the place for you. Most of the decent shops have closed (including Thorntons) and the bookshop is very boring. This is modern shopping – a soulless process involving shuffling round like a zombie and dying a little bit in every boring, over-priced shop.

Julia bought a diary for next year, and that was that. Even without the poor pickings at the shops it wasn’t a great trip, as the rain was cold and the sky was difficult to differentiate from the dark grey of the roof slates.

From there we slipped down to Denby Pottery.  Julia had seen some in the shop at the outlet and mentioned we ought to look in at the factory shop one day. It’s not far away and I can take a hint. It is her birthday soon and she’s being no help at all in helping me select a present.

It didn’t help once we got to the factory – the gift shop has been dumbed down since we last went and is hard to tell from the average garden centre hell hole gift shop.

However, we did have a very good scone with butter and jam. It was sweet, light and still slightly warm. You’d have enjoyed it if you’d been there. Top marks for that.

After that we went home. I had a snooze in front of the TV then had a bowl of soup before posting. Once I’ve posted I will take Number Two Son to work.

My life is a real roller coaster ride of fun and frolics.

 

 

 

Cream Teas

I mentioned cream teas a couple of days ago, and was asked to provide more details. It seems that the concept of the cream tea hasn’t travelled to America, which is surprising as it contains a lot of fat and sugar, which are what I consider to be two of the main ingredients in American food. Looking at the Wiki entry for clotted cream it seems it would be classed as butter in the USA, which would really confuse things.

The cream tea as we know it dates back to the 1850s, according to the Cream Tea Society. Other sources cite dates of 1931 and even 1964. The latter date is cited by the OED, and I can’t say they’ve exactly covered themselves in glory in this case. I’m sure I’ve seen references to them in the 1920s and 30s (whilst reading classic crime novels and I will make a note when I next see a reference – I haven’t made one before because I didn’t realise I would ever need the information.

There are even references going back to the 10th century.

My mother, who worked in a farm tea shop at weekends in the dim and distant past, remembered making cream teas well before 1964.

TESCO cream tea

The normal cream tea consists of scones, strawberry jam, clotted cream and tea. There is a traditional Cornish version which uses Cornish splits, but I’ve never actually seen one. In the south west I’ve often had it with plain scones, though in the rest of the country it’s usually a fruit scone.

I’ve also had other jam, and in fact I do like apricot jam with my cream tea.

There’s no such latitude with the cream. Cornish Clotted Cream  is a protected product and can only be made in Cornwall from milk produced in Cornwall.

As for the tea to accompany it, I noted that at TESCO you can pay extra and have it with coffee. I’m not sure why, but my view of coffee is not a positive one. Any beverage that is improved by passing through the digestive tract of a weasel is not really one for me.

That just leaves one area to cover – cream first with jam on top (Devon style) or jam first with cream on top (Cornish style). Debrett’s says jam first and cream on top.

It’s like the milk in first debate – there is no right answer.

Misleading picture

Note that they serve it with jam on top. In reality the jam provided with the cream tea has no chunks of fruit in it, so doesn’t look quite so attractive.

 

At the Garden Centre

We had some time to kill yesterday in Peterborough so we went to Notcutt’s Garden Centre at Ferry Meadows for an Apple and Cinnamon scone. I took the opportunity for some spring flower photography.

The scone was large and had a good flavour (much of it down to sugar, I think). On the downside, it was a bit dry and crumbly and could have done with more apple. It wasn’t bad but I won’t be rushing in to buy another.

Dad’s brother Tom was down visiting from Lancashire. He’s 86 and much fitter than Dad, who just turned 88. That’s probably due to a lifetime working outdoors, in contrast to Dad who spent most of his time in cars and offices. He travelled with his son and daughter-in-law this time as the drive is getting a bit tiring these days.

After Peterborough they are going to Buckinghamshire to see my Uncle Jim (94). He spent his life using a bicycle and never owned a car. He met my aunt when he was stationed in Lancashire during the war and after he left the army cycled up from London to see her. He’s still 100% mentally, though he recently had a knee replaced.

I’m seeing a pattern here.