Tag Archives: stained glass

More Glass

These are a few more photos from the visit to the Stained Glass Museum. It’s surprising, on revisiting the photographs, just how bad they are. The two roundels below give some of my troubles – they were both the same colour when I took them, but they are now distinctly different. I tried to match them up but this is as good as it gets.

They were made in the 1920s by Thomas Cowell and based on the dancer Isadora Duncan, decorating his bathroom in Surbiton for many years.

Several of the pictures are blurred and others are slanted (due partly to my problems with perspective and partly due to not all of the panes being a regular shape). I knew that one had a reflection of what looked like an old testament prophet (I really do need to trim my beard and remaining hair) but I noticed that several others have reflections of the shirt I was wearing that day. It’s the check shirt I always seem to have on in profile photos and selfies. Strangely, it didn’t show on the day, or on my first look, but it’s plainly there now.

The glass on the left is the Duke of Clarence, grandson of Queen Victoria, depicted as St George in a memorial window (he died at 28) which used to be in Buckingham Palace.

On the right is a window commemorating Queen Victoria. It used to be in St Mary Magdalene’s Church, Barnstaple. It was designed by Hugh Arnold.

I’ve included on of the Old Testament Prophet photos, once I realised I couldn’t get a decent shot without me in it I decided to go for the publicity.

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Self-portrait of a poor photographer

Finally we have the window that also provides the featured photo – Lancelot and Elaine based on a German Art Nouveau tapestry designed in 1898. The window was made by Andrew Stoddart (1876 – 1940) and installed in his Nottingham home.

In 1911 he was living with his wife, 2 daughters, brother and servant at 9, Clarendon Street. I’m not sure if that was the house with this window, but it looks like the sort of house that might have a had an elegant window like this. At the time the two brothers were listed as Stained Glass Artists. Searching the internet reveals several of his windows are still on disply, including St Andrew’s and Long Eaton Library.

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Lancelot and Elaine

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The May Queen

And Finally – the May Queen (1900). Designed by George Parlby and painted with paint and silver stain by  Thomas Cowell (1870 – 1949), who also painted the dancers at the top of the page.

Stained Glass for Easter

A few more pictures from the stained glass museum at Ely. I thought it was an appropriate time to show a few more. After a struggle with my connection, which turned out to be a problem with my WordPress account, I’m short of time, so will add detail later. (I have now added details to the photographs, in case you want to know more about the glass – not sure if they show on the featured photo but they are the same as the one below from Essex Unitarian Church.)

The Stained Glass Museum – Ely

As you may have guessed from a previous post, I’m not impressed with the admission charges at Ely Cathedral. In fact, I’m not really keen on spending money at all, unless it’s on books or unsuitable food. So if I say it was a pleasure to spend £4.50 on the Stained Glass Museum you’ll realise I liked it.

Two roundels showing scenes from the life of St Vincent, c 1220-50 Burgundy region

I’ve always liked stained glass. There’s something magic about sunlight filtering through coloured glass, in much the same way that there’s something wondrous about sunbeams streaming through trees.

I’ll leave it to the pictures now, as I have nothing to say that will improve the glass.

Left, Angel Musician c1440 – 80 Distinctive East Anglian style of painting

Right, Christ and His Followers, designed by Alexander Walker (active 1896 – 1929) though the label says this is c 1885. From a church in Leith. Part of the new wave of Scottish glass – religious zeal having destroyed all he old glass and prevented the making of new glass for several hundred years.

Left, Head of a Young Boy c 1930, designed and made by Christopher Webb (1886 – 1966)

Right, Inner Space by Paul San Casciani b 1935 – representing the view of cells

As you can see, there is a variety of glass, including old and new with a mix of traditional and novel subjects.

The Coming Week – a Trip to Ely

I took a lot of photographs yesterday during our trip to Ely. If we’d got up earlier, and if we hadn’t been been slowed down by my elderly bladder and the poor navigation of one who shall remain nameless I would have taken more.

In the coming week you can therefore expect a helping of Cromwellian politics, a discourse on the evils of Ely, photographs of stone faces, a description of domestic disharmony due to the distaff side’s inability to read a map, a picture of Prince Albert and his piercing look, a visit to the Stained Glass Museum and some suggestions on how the Church could finance the £6,000 a day it takes to keep the Cathedral open.

Here are some photographs to give you some idea of what is coming up.