Crepuscular rays at Rufford Park

Time to Try Tanka

Breakfast was baked eggs. I put chopped spring onions, mushrooms. ham, tomatoes and grated cheese in an oiled dish, broke on three eggs and seasoned with black pepper. It’s a substantial brunch designed to last until this evening (with possibly a scone to keep us going) so I think three eggs is OK.

In the oven for twelve minutes (it wasn’t fully heated when I put them in) and Julia said hers was a little too firm for her tastes. She will get ten minutes next time because she is a barbarian who eats eggs before they are decently hard. I was happy with my 15 minutes as I like mine hard, and don’t mind them rubbery.

It’s a simple recipe, but one I seem to have forgotten over the years. Do you have recipes like that?

There are no photos as I ate it well before thinking of them. Maybe next time…

I managed to get three submissions off last night and this afternoon I had an acceptance from the batch sent out on the 18th. I sent ten haiku and eight tanka off to two different editors at the same magazine (they often have different editors for different things and allow you to submit to both) and have now had one accepted by each editor. I’m counting it as two submissions and two acceptances. If it had been one editor at the magazine I’d have only counted it as one. This is one way I’m upping my submission numbers. The other is trying new magazines. I’ve just submitted to one that holds the record for my speediest rejection. I thought I’d give it another go. The editor has changed and the so has the system – if they like it they accept within 14 days. If they don’t like it you can submit it elsewhere after 14 days. It’s a little imprecise, but simple enough as a system, and at least they aren’t going to set any new records.

Julia is making something complicated with chicken and marinades and stuff (she takes more trouble over the food that I do). It smells good, and she has just taken it out of the oven. Time, I think, to load this and eat.

I’m also sending two tanka prose off (the inelegantly named tanka equivalent of haibun) – one of them features crepuscular rays, hence the photo.

31 thoughts on “Time to Try Tanka

  1. Helen

    As always, congratulations on your poetry successes.

    In answer to your question about recipes you haven’t used for a long time, I do have these but can’t think if I’ve actually got round to going back to any.

    I’m amazed that your breakfast can last you till evening.

    Reply
      1. Helen

        And I’ve remembered a past recipe.. Chinese mashed potato. I actually only made it once when I returned to Britain but basically it’s mashed potato with spring onions. Maybe they add MSG as I couldn’t get it to taste quite the same.

        Anyway, I’m going to give it another go this evening 😊

      2. Helen

        Oh, that’s the name I call it but I have seen it recently on a menu (not a Chinese restaurant) called something like ‘spring onion mash’.

  2. paolsoren

    When you submit do you send a hard copy or do you send a PDF file or something? I can’t send anything to England if they want a hard copy because (Covid) it takes sometimes three month from Australia.

    Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      Most poetry magazines seem to accept submissions by email – normally wanting them in the body of the email to avoid having additional files to open. I only submit to one magazine that wants hard copies and they do that because they have been going for years and are very traditional. One or two use submission portals, which I don’t entirely trust, but mainly work OK, though one once scattered my pixels into cyberspace.

      Reply
  3. LA

    Certain things I go back to looking at the recipe. My mind is very choosy as to what it takes in long term

    Reply
  4. Lavinia Ross

    Good luck with the submissions!

    Rick gets goose eggs from where he works part-time, and often makes a dish like the one you make. One only needs one of those giant eggs. 🙂

    Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      It must make an amazing baked egg dish. 🙂 We used guineafowl eggs, duck eggs and the odd goose egg when we were on the farm – always a treat.

      Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      I’ve never been able to enjoy a runny yolk. Don’t know why, but it’s been the same ever since I was a kid. Bearing in mind I’m a third generation poultry farmer, this is strange.

      Reply
  5. jodierichelle

    Bravo on two acceptances! I would have counted it as 36 submissions. (18 submissions to 2 different editors.) And 2 acceptances from 36 submissions is fabulous in literary terms. You need to give yourself more credit.

    Hope dinner was as good as it smelled. Re: the eggs – I, also, go through phases in cooking. Often it is related to the seasons. I don’t often cook chicken pie in the summer, for example. And I am often surprised to remember a dish that I love but just haven’t cooked for a while.

    Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      Ys, it’s a strange sort of amnesia. In winter I sometimes think back to my rich liver and bacon casserole. Then I remember that Julia doesn’t like it…

      Yes, every bit as good as the aroma. 🙂

      Reply

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