Tag Archives: sorting

The Benefits of Looking Closely

From the point of view of my diet, today was a bit of a disaster. Julia brought Danish pastries when she returned from work, and while she was buying them, she bought sausage rolls that were on special offer. We ate them, then I opened a parcel from my sister and had a piece of Grasmere Gingerbread. Only one, as a quality check. It was excellent. It seems she had been buying some by post for birthday gifts and decided to treat us too. It’s delicious, and she is very kind, and nobody held me down and forced me to eat it…

I had a small meal for tea. I only had room for a small meal.

Meanwhile, after a classic senior moment, I am taking delivery of two sets of internet groceries tonight. I thought I’d cancelled TESCO after ordering from ASDA. It seems I didn’t. By the time I realised (when I saw their text at bedtime) it was too late. Normally their text comes in at around 10,00 am, which gives plenty of time for cancellation. Yesterday it came in after 5.00 pm, by which time my phone was charging in another room. Unlike many young people today, I am able to go for hours, sometimes all day, without checking my phone. I went for seven hours without checking my phone (anyone who really wants me is quite capable of ringing me) and I missed the text. As a result I have paid for delivery, and  a small order surcharge, to have a load of bread and vegetables delivered. We will be giving some bread away later tonight and vegetable soup is going to be on the menu several times in the next week.

Getting old is no fun.

We looked at a box of stuff in the shop today. A lady brought it in, with no great expectations. After an initial look we lowered her expectations even more. Then I had a look at the box of costume jewellery she had brought in. It’s not our sort of stuff, but we always try to help if we can. The “costume” jewellery included a cameo in a gold mount, a Victorian gold brooch with turquoises, a gold cravat pin and two gold tie pins. It’s not the sort of stuff we deal in, but I told her where to take it for a friendly reception and a decent offer. We did, however, give her the best part of £300 for two gold coins that had been made into cufflinks. That was a pleasant surprise for all concerned.

The morals from today – don’t throw anything away until you have taken advice, have a good look at everything and sort your stuff out before you die so you don’t lumber your kids with it.

British West Africa 1/10th of a Penny

In which a joke of questionable taste is told, coins are sorted and I am forced out of the way by a rude woman in the supermarket.

I decided to employ a sub-heading as I couldn’t convey it all in the title. (Added later: then I forgot to write a title! Senior Moment Alert!)

Last week, having failed the blood test, I received a panicky phone call from the anti-coagulation service. They do take things a bit seriously at times. All I did was forget a couple of pills and drift off target a bit – it’s not like I’m hovering at Death’s door. I’m not even at Death’s garden gate. In fact, I’m feeling quite perky.

As I get older I really ought to stop saying things like that, as I’m going to look pretty stupid if I drop dead tomorrow.

I’m pretty sure the anti-coagulation is working as I bled quite a bit when they pulled the needle out.

We had a visitor in the shop today, which was good as I hadn’t seen him for about ten years. He used to be a coin dealer, but he’s taken up a new career since then and now takes secular funeral services. He also told us one of the funniest jokes I’ve ever heard. Unfortunately I can’t repeat it.

It wasn’t rude and it didn’t feature bad language but it was, shall we say, in questionable taste, and looked at something from an unusual angle.

I laughed so hard I nearly fell off my seat.

Then I carried on sorting. Stamps, shillings and crowns. Ah, the glamour!

Finally, as you may have guessed from the first paragraph, I went shopping. It all went relatively well until I got to the checkout. The manned checkouts were all crammed, so I decided to use the self-service. They, it seemed, had been giving trouble all day, and the one I used queried six of my nine articles, necessitating the intervention of a staff member each time.

When all was done I started to leave the shop. As I got to the doorway a woman came up behind me and pushed past, which isn’t good when you’re using a stick for balance. She then made someone else swerve to avoid her then walked directly towards someone coming into the shop and made them stop the let her past.

She wasn’t being pursued, she was just very rude, arrogant and inconsiderate.

All this rush meant that she got to her car, started the engine and engaged reverse gear ready to escape.

Meanwhile, I put a bit of a spurt on.

And once I was behind her car, as she waited impatiently to reverse out, I walked behind her…very…very…slowly.

I don’t usually manage to get my own back, but today everything just fell right. And it felt good.

 

Six Thousand Shillings Sitting on a Shelf

We started sorting shillings at 10.00 and finished at 14.30. If we’d started four hours earlier, or spent another hour and a half sorting, it would take the tongue-twisting title to a whole new level.

A sixish start spending six hours sorting six thousand shillings sitting on a sagging shelf is not a sentence to be attempted lightly, or in polite company. Even for an alliteration addict like me, it’s a bit much.

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Silvery sorted shillings sitting in a sorting tray

The sets of  shillings are slowly taking shape. Coincidentally my back is also taking on a new shape, which is much more hunched than it was a couple of days ago. Shilling Sorters Spine is shortly going to be written up in The Lancet.  Or possibly the BMJ. One of my friends was once written up in one of them after the premature detonation of a cannon.

We were re-enacting the English Civil War in the Sealed Knot somewhere in Somerset (that’s not a security measure – I just can’t remember exactly where). The mop for swabbing out the barrel was a bit worn and it allowed a glowing ember to survive the operation. When the powder was rammed home the ember ignited the charge while he was still ramming.

This is clearly a bad thing.

Fortunately, because he was using good technique, the ramrod merely took the skin off his palms as it whistled across the “battlefield”. The blast also blew off his shirt sleeves and peppered his arms with fragments of black powder.

And that, when one of the doctors realised this was a rare chance to write up the hazards of muzzle-loading cannon, was how he appeared in the medical press.

We never did find his shirt sleeves…

Just to give you some idea of what the blast looks like I’ve purloined a photo from the web.

Image result for sealed knot cannon

 

Another of my mates was shot in the small of the back (mere inches above anywhere that would have provided a highly amusing and ribald anecdote) by a cannon at Naseby. But that is another story.

Shillings, Sorting and Sunset

Julia had a restful day today and, as a result, is feeling better.  She seems surprised by this, despite events proving quite clearly that her bad back is linked to doing too much.

She’s just been reading a report on research done on Mensa members. It seems that the hairier you are, the smarter you are. She then offered the opinion that I should delay the remodelling of my beard, which I have been contemplating for some time. I’m not sure the correlation works quite as clearly as that, but it’s something to think about.

I wouldn’t want to decrease my IQ by cutting my hair, after all, by using ebay I’m already damaging my intelligence quite enough.

You don’t need a great deal of intelligence to sort shillings, lift boxes and organise accessories, which have been my main activities of day.

It was still light when we left the shop at 4.20, which is a good sign, and I took several shots of the sky at that point, before doing a few more in the supermarket car park whilst buying things for tea. I tried for some shots of the tiny sliver of moon but it wasn’t light enough and the long exposure meant that they all ended up shaky.

 

 

 

Time Moves On

Julia’s phone has been going all day. The large polytunnel in the gardens proved unable to resist the wind last night and the ancient, brittle sheeting disintegrated. Despite being off ill, she has had a constant stream of texts, photographs and requests for decisions.

To call in a team of experts would cost £500 over and above the cost of the plastic. At the moment she is waiting for an answer from the Young Farmers’ Club. to see if they are able to help.

In the shop we assembled a couple of office chairs. They are now pushed up to the desk in the middle room, waiting for a dedicated ebay team. However, it will probably end up with me and Eddie. One of the customers is currently refurbishing a computer for me and then he’s going to set a printer up a wireless network. This might seem normal to you, but it’s close to being miraculous to me, as none of my previous jobs have involved using a computer. I had my own for doing ebay, but I’ve never worked for someone else, or with someone else, using a computer.

This, I suppose, is the 21st century.

After that I had to remove a coin collection from plastic pages. Over the years the pages had sealed the coins in, so I ended up cutting them out with scissors.  It’s a tedious job, but there was a Maundy fourpence in it, amongst the silver threepenny bits, so it felt worthwhile.

It’s even more tedious than sorting out the two plastic boxes of mixed cupro-nickel coins. Half-crowns, florins, shillings and sixpences plus large-sized 10 and 5 pence coins. I’m so used to the small 10p and 5p that the old-fashioned large ones come as a bit of a surprise. Thinking of it, I should have taken pictures to illustrate this. I may do that tomorrow.

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Newark, Notts

In the afternoon I was off, so I took a quick trip to Newark to see my mate on the market. He was one of three stallholders who had braved the wind and rain, and they had all spread out to make the market look fuller. There were seven trees down on the way, with two teams still working on clearing them. It’s been quite windy round here. Fortunately all the roads had been cleared so there were no delays.

That’s about it. Julia is continuing her slow recovery, but while I was out this morning she inspected the garden for storm damage and, whilst struggling to keep her balance, managed to topple over.  She does that. As soon as I’m distracted she tries to do too much and sets herself back. Fortunately she hasn’t hurt herself, but I’m thinking of rigging the house with CCTV so I can prevent a repeat.

I didn’t get many photos today, just a few silhouettes of Newark and some sky.

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A dry view of Newark