Tag Archives: painkillers

On the Mend

Using the trouser test, I am quite mobile today. This has been the case for the last few days, though the situation does deteriorate towards the evening. That was why I resorted to heavyweight pain killers and ended up writing about constipation. I learned a couple of valuable lessons there – one being to read the information leaflets that come in pill packets and the other to resist the lure of self-medication. I’ve previously used co-codamol to take the edge of my arthritis but only one or two doses and day and usually just for the one day. The pills I used last week have been on the shelf for around eighteen months. That’s how little I use them.

When I picked them up last week I actually smiled and felt a feeling of relief.That’s how bad things were – worse than arthritis. It set a small alarm bell ringing, as I know someone who became addicted to them, and I wasn’t sure my reaction was 100% healthy. I took them on two successive evenings and each time took a couple of extras, just to make sure I would be able to sleep. Not particularly sensible, but not wildly irresponsible either. On the third night I took paracetamol and the next night didn’t need anything. However, regular readers will already know about the side-effects.

I just looked up a list of people who died on the toilet, expecting to find quite a few – Elvis and George II being two I already knew about, but the internet is surprisingly silent on the subject. Toilet-based fatalities seem mainly based around political assassinations in mediaeval toilets, which allowed access for spears, and modern drug takers.

There is one ironic case – a convicted murderer in the USA was spared the electric chair but, a little later, decided to repair his television whilst sitting on a metal toilet. There are so many questions in my mind regarding this, but let’s just say it didn’t end well for him.

You may also want to look up this link – a disaster that befell the Holy Roman Empire in 1184 but seems to have missed all the history books I have ever read. I cannot think why.

Finally, thank you for your enquiries and good wishes – I am mostly recovered. Physically I feel fine, mentally I am restored – I just need my mobility. The main mobility problem is that the NHS seem unable to bandage a leg without doing the foot and ankle. This means I can’t get a shoe on and I can’t drive. I’ve had this argument with them before. They don’t want me to recover, they just want to bandage me like a diagram from a 1920s textbook.

 

An Avocado Day

The day started badly when I woke at 6.20 am and found that my hopes regarding my knee (which had become very painful during the course of the evening) had come to nothing. Despite having rested, it was still painful. Fortunately I had taken a walking stick upstairs and was able to make it to the bathroom without too much cursing.

I took ibuprofen, even though they interfere with the warfarin and went back to bed. I couldn’t find any paracetamol and the ibuprofen gel was, inconveniently, downstairs.

At 8.10 I woke again to find that the ibuprofen had lived up to my expectations and done bugger all to alleviate the pain.

That’s what I find about painkillers these days. The ones you can buy at the supermarket don’t do much to help with the sort of pain I get as old age creeps on, and the ones that work, like laudanum, are out of favour. You can’t read a depiction of Victorian life without tripping over gallons of the stuff but, despite the insistence of the Conservative party on returning to Victorian values, you just can’t get hold of it.

By the time I got downstairs the post had been, as had the bin men, and there was a letter waiting for me from the anti-coagulant service. I have, once again, managed to hit target with my recent blood test and have been rewarded with an appointment in August.

This amazes me, as I have a bad habit of often taking the pills either too late or not at all. My phone sounds an alarm at 8pm and I tend to switch it off with the words “I will have to take my pills in a while.” There are always better things to do at 8pm.

A quick shout out for the posties and bin men here – they are doing a great job keeping civilisation going, but they aren’t complaining and they aren’t getting the thanks they deserve.

We had a TESCO delivery last night at 9pm (because it’s cheaper at that time) and it was much more accurate than the ASDA delivery last week. As a result we were able to breakfast on bacon sandwiches made using croissants and our new supply of brown sauce. Life does not get much better…

I also picked up my new warfarin prescription from the pharmacy and took advantage of that to buy a box of co-codamol. It’s not laudanum, but as I write, ten hours after taking two tablets, I have nothing more than a dull ache in the knee. You are only supposed to take it for a maximum three days but I’ve never needed to take more than a couple of doses before it’s sorted me out. Strangely, despite the three day stipulation, it comes in a box containing enough for four days.

I then made lunch, consisting of sourdough rye bread and avocado – I seem to have become much more middle-class during lockdown – with finely chopped wild garlic leaves which Julia had foraged whilst out walking in the local park.

After that the day became less interesting.

Avocado and Wild Garlic

Avocado and Wild Garlic

Yes, it’s the same picture, but I like to add two photos where I can. Note the square plate, which I always consider a sign of gastronomic sophistication. I bought several in my abortive bid to become a food blogger.

It’s really avocado, wild garlic, coriander leaves (and stalks) and black pepper. The rye sourdough was a TESCO substitution for ordinary sourdough, which, after last week’s bread substitution from ASDA suggests that TESCO is a better supermarket for home deliveries. At least they understand bread.

Trouble and Strife

We were having a laugh about Julia’s bad back and the “in sickness and in health” part of the wedding vows a couple of days ago (bearing in mind that she spent six months running round after me last year).

You should never tempt fate.

On Thursday, after overdoing things in the garden she went to her second job in the Leisure Centre, but had to ring for a lift home as she was unable to sit at her desk due to the back pain.

We spent the evening applying hot water bottles and anti-inflammatories, but it was just as bad this morning.

The doctor fitted her in this morning and I took time off from the new job to take her down and bring her back (I am not a model employee). She is currently furnished with painkillers and muscle relaxants, and I am in charge of providing a constant supply of hot water bottles.

I’m back from work now and she is catching up on her sleep.

I’ll be back later, but for now I’m off to boil a kettle…