Tag Archives: Llandudno

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

The morning passed fairly quickly, though I’m breaking in new shoes and my bunion was twinging a bit. Julia has treated me to a set of shoe stretchers and they have a special attachment for the bunion area so I’m expecting the problem will be solved tonight.

Because of that I went home when we finished at lunchtime and did a few chores, after removing my shoes. I would have liked to have seen my friends on the other side of town but you can’t really walk into a jeweller and slip your shoes off.

I then set to on the new poetry system I’m developing. I now make files up, named for the relevant magazine and submission date. I then have something to aim at when using the computer, instead of relying on memory and scraps of paper. After I send one tonight I will have four submissions out. This is the most I’ve ever had out at one time, and the next two lots are due to go out in October. As yet, I have nothing good enough to go out, which is very worrying. I don’t like it when that happens.

It’s my fault. I’m just submitting at a higher rate than I can write. It takes me seven to ten minutes to write the prose portion of a haibun when everything is going well. Unfortunately it then takes weeks to hone it and write the haiku. In a few weeks I’m sure I’ll have caught up a bit and everything will be back in balance.

In two to four weeks, I’m guessing, I will start getting things rejected and they can be sent out again.

Generally you are asked for three haibun in a submission, and as a principle most magazines will only accept one as they are short of space and want to give everyone a fair go. I can usually place at least one of the rejects, sometimes both, within a few months. Of the three that were rejected last week, two are already out again and the third piece which accompanies them has been out twice before already. Yes, they’ve all been tightened up but they are all essentially the same pieces.

Recycling, that’s the key.

They are all good pieces, they just weren’t fully finished when I sent them out. That’s what happens when you rush things.

Sometimes, when it’s clear that nobody wants it, I’ll admit defeat. The post Murder Your Darlings was one of my defeats. After four attempts I killed one of my favourites by publishing it myself. Editors don’t like previously published work.

However, what I didn’t tell you at the time was that I’d picked over the corpse and turned it into a poem. It will be submitted with a group of poems later tonight.

Reduce (the work), reuse (resubmit) and recycle (use the bits for something else) – it works in writing just thye same as everything else.

Let’s see what happens next.

I’ll mention no names, but thirty years ago I used to know a man who wrote military history books, and, by the time he’d done three, I started to see a pattern as the research from the previous book formed a good portion of the next one. I reckon he wrote nine books from the research he’d done on the first three, This is smart work and good use of resources.

It is also a contrast with a University professor I know. He’s written five books and they are all more or less the same. That, I feel, is lazy, even by my standards.

Finally, the recycled photographs. The gulls from Llandudno Pier feature in one of the resubmitted haibun, which gives me an excuse to reuse some of them.

Larcenous Laridae of Llandudno

I refer specifically to the Herring Gull, or Larus Argentatus as its mother calls it. Other gulls are available and most of them have better manners. As you may recall, we had a trip to the seaside last week but couldn’t download the photos. I finally managed.

Part One is the gull special.We had a coffee after arrival, and I took a few photos of gulls as we sat round. I already had a subject in mind, as I’d been the victim of an attempted hit and run mugging five years ago when a gull had combed my hair with its feet as it tried to reach my chips.

Little did I realise, as I took a few general shots, that I was, within the hour, going to be the victim of another, more successful, attempt.

I had a strawberry and chocolate ice cream clutched in my hand when it happened.

There was a flutter, a flash of white and, when everything cleared, a distinct lack of ice cream.

It was lying on the pier, melting. And I was standing over it fencing with my walking stick so that the malefactor would not profit from its crime.

Bloody gulls!

 

Oh, What a Day!

It’s just taken eleven minutes to open WordPress using the netbook. It’s getting worse and I suppose in the next month or two it will probably cease to work completely.

That leaves me five minutes to post.

Today has encompassed a Senior Moment, a trip to Llandudno, a seagull attack and three piers. Oh, and a lifeboat launch and a Scone Chronicle.

I’m going to post now – that way I keep up my daily posting record, even if it is a bit short.

See you tomorrow.

Tractors, Tribulations and Old Men

After dropping Julia off yesterday I went to see Men in Sheds on the farm. As you know, I don’t really like going, but I wanted to see them before Flintham Show to check on the Little Grey Fergie and to let them know Julia would be round with a group from the Mencap gardens.

There was a covey of four red-legged partridges in the lane, all taking different ways ape and avoid having their photo taken – flying through a gateway, flying over the top of the hedge, running through a hole in the hedge or running along the lane and diving into long grass. I prophesy that in the next few months one will be run over and at least one shot unless they work on their survival techniques.

The Men in Sheds were a bit thin on the ground, with just four of them, plus two women. Women? Whatever next? Two were in Llandudno, one at the doctor and nobody was sure about the others. I hope I’m still driving to Llandudno in my 80s.

The tractor is still in bits, but will be going to Flintham in bits as a display to show the sort of things they get up to. They were actually clearing out a barn today, in their role of cheap labour for the farm, though they have been making nest boxes for owls.

On the way I took some photos of the air crash memorial, which will be covered in another post soon, and while I was there (after having a nice cup of tea) I had a look round at the gardens.

It’s interesting to see things like the anenomes and osteospermum, which were donated as straggly transplants by neighbours, giving a big splash of colour to the garden. Same with the choisya (Mexican Orange Blossom). It was a straggly twig when we planted it (50 pence from a garden centre rescue bin) and now it’s a glossy bright green bush. Same goes for the dog roses – mere whips when we planted the four years ago – full of flowers and fruit now.

It may not be our garden anymore, but it still gives me a sense of achievement to see it, particularly when you think how cheaply we did it.

Things are pretty much as they were last time I visited. The only difference is that instead of merely being absent, the last tenant is now being referred to as having “done a runner”. The barn that is currently being cleared is being cleared of his property to defray costs.

Ironic, I said, that after evicting us to maximise income, there has been no income.

Greed does not pay.

 

 

 

Llandudno – a brief visit

On our way back from Wales we visited Llandudno. Since then, things have been a bit hectic and I forgot all about it.

Was it really only five weeks ago? I seem to have packed quite a lot into the time, though at the same time I also seem to have achieved nothing. The image of a hamster running in its wheel comes to mind, working hard to get nowhere. Even without the metaphor I often think of hamsters in wheels – they are just so funny.

We parked by the Mad Hatter statue, as you can see. The Liddell family had a holiday home in Llandudno, though there is still argument about whether Lewis Carroll ever visited. There are other statues scattered round town, though we didn’t have time to view the others properly. By the time we’d tracked down toilets (this was pre-operation so I  wasn’t as self-sufficient in that department as I am now), chased gulls off the car and toured the pier (which included eating doughnuts) there wasn’t much time left, as we still had to get home.

Llandudno is a lovely place if you ever get a chance to visit. The resort was planned in the 1850s and developed by Lord Mostyn, which is why it was developed in such a controlled manner.

We’ve never really seen much of the town, and reading up on it, I’m amazed how much more there is to do. Looks like we’ll have to go back again one day.