Tag Archives: country park

The Woods of Rufford Abbey

It was sunny today for the first time in three days so it was off to Rufford Abbey with the camera and a happy heart. We weren’t the only ones, as there was a full car park and what seemed to be a coach trip too.

I’ll put the bird photos up later, along with the story of the trials of bird photography and several hundred words of excuses for not doing better.

For now, just have a look at the sun and woodlands.

The brick picture shows a brick from the Welbeck brickyard. Julia spotted it. She likes looking for old local bricks. Production of bricks at Welbeck Colliery started in 1926 and the stamp presumably changed to NCB Welbeck in 1947 with nationalisation.

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Old brick in the woods – from Welbech Colliery brickyard

My Favourite Friday

 

On Friday we planned to visit Sherwood Forest, photograph the oak trees and look for Robin Hood.

Sorry, I’m a bit late wth this – it’s so late on Saturday that it’s almost Sunday.

So much for my good intentions about being more organised and reliable. (And that’s before I reveal that I left my spare batteries at home and had to use the back-up camera).

The plan was that we would get up early and make the best of the light, but their was no light, just a foggy murkiness. So we went back to sleep for another hour. By that time the light was a bit better so we set off for Sherwood Forest. It’s not quite as big as it once was. At one time it covered 115,000 acres: now the country park manages just 450 acres. Royal Forests once covered a third of southern England, including 100% of the counties of Essex and Huntingdonshire.

Fortunately a Royal Forest wasn’t full of trees, which would have made it very awkward for living and farming, they were just areas where Forest Laws took precedence over normal laws. This made life difficult, but still allowed for fields, grazing, marshes and other land without trees.

Anyway, in today’s country park there are around 1,000 ancient oaks, all looking to be on their last legs. Despite this they keep coming back year after year. ┬áThe most famous is the Major Oak, around 800 – 1,000 years old and held up by a cradle of wood and iron. It was supposedly a hideout used by Robin Hood, but if it’s only 800 years old it would have only been an acorn at the time.

This is just a selection of photos – as usual ┬áhave managed to take too many!