Tag Archives: book shop

Guess Where We Went Today?

The sign might be a giveaway. We started off with breakfast at Harvester, which featured rubber sausages and a severe lack of melon or crumpets. I rather disgraced myself with a couple of muffins as an alternative, despite the no bread and potatoes rule. I suppose they were under pressure with having a surge for half-term. However, they were still charging the same price so they should provide the same service.

From there we went to the garden to drop off plastic crates and donated bird feeders. Then, via an ill-fated “shortcut” we dropped into Derbyshire. At one point, with the hedges nearly touching the door mirrors and a strip of grass growing down the centre of the road, Julia started her impression of duelling banjoes…

We eventually found civilisation, in the shape of the Homebase DIY store at Ashbourne, where we bought a bag of Scottish River Cobbles and some half-price violas. It cost £10 for a bag of rocks, which Julia is going to use in a project. I was all for stopping by a river and helping ourselves to some for free but Julia pointed out that this would be irresponsible and illegal. For the purposes of the blog I’ll pretend that this was what stopped me doing it.

From there we drove into the low cloud to visit the High Peak Bookstore and Cafe. As you can see from the header picture, grey is creeping in and the cafe is getting more space on the sign. This is true in physical space too. The cookery books have been removed and were being replaced with jars of jam on the former bookshelves. We were able to sit and watch this act of sacrilage when we visited.

Tripadvisor is full of upbeat comments about book stock and prices. They must be being visited by people all love thing the same thing, and I am out of step. The fact that the shop reply is always identical adds to the impression of sameness.

The tea and cake were good and the book selection is generally holding up well though the nature section has still not recovered and the craft books are now starting to suffer. It could still be OK, but I’m still concerned. Last time I went head to head against a cafe I came off second best.

On the way back I tried a few photographs. Light hadn’t been good during the day but the view was pleasantly misty and as it coincided with passing a lay-by I thought I’d have a go. As luck would have it, the camera managed to get rid of the atmospheric haze and I resorted to the effects button.

 

 

A Day in Derbyshire

We dropped Number 2 son off in Sheffield after lunch and took a trip into the Peaks. It was a lovely day, the verges were full of celandines and wood anemones in the appropriate places and all was right with the world, apart from one thing. For some reason whenever we say something worth photographing there was nowhere to park.

I’m not saying Derbyshire County Council has designed the road system to stop drivers taking photographs but if they ever decide to do so it will be difficult to improve on the current situation.

Despite this I did manage to get some shots of scenery, or fields and rocks, as Julia pointed out. With a bit more enthusiasm I could have parked and walked a bit more, but that would have meant spending less time at the Brierlow Bar Bookshop.

We’ve been there before, as regular readers will know. The tea is still up to standard and we had some very acceptable cashew and banana cake (though it was a little rich, even for me). I think my new healthy diet might be blunting my ability to appreciate cake. It’s a stiff price to pay, even for a few extra years of life.

I’m afraid a high price has also been paid by the book stock. The Nature section doesn’t seem as strong as it used to be, and the Poetry section seems to be depleted, although my other favourite sections seem either the same (History) or expanded (Crime Fiction). Julia says the Craft section is much smaller too. I like tea but I like books too. I am conflicted.

I suppose I should have bought a guidebook to the Peak District to address my ignorance but I bought one on stained glass, one on War Poets and one about an archaeologist who solves murders.

That’s why there’s a lack of information on Lead Mining, sheep and Blue John in this post. In future posts I will try to address this failing.

 

 

 

 

Wet, wet, wet

When we got to Sheffield we made sure Number Two son had groceries and then I hauled out the map to look for Wigtwizzle. It wasn’t there. It may be very small, it may be like Brigadoon, or it may only appear on maps that weren’t purchased from discount book shops. So we decided on Plan B and zipped up the M1 to Wakefield for an hour at Hampsons Garden Centre.

It was, as usual, over-staffed and manic, with a car park full of plants on trollies and a cafe full of staff impersonating zombies. Despite this the hot beef sandwiches were excellent, and we escaped after buying books, bird feeders, meal worms, pies and cheap tat. No plants – we are suffering from gardening overload. Despite the generally unwelcoming air in the cafe (including notices about not eating your own food and not abusing staff on pain of being reported to the police) it’s always a decent meal. I’d give it 4 stars as the home-made pies, occasional cheery service and reasonable prices (especially breakfast) make up for a lot.

After that it was off to the Peak District, where it started raining as we crossed the boundary into the National Park and continued until we arrived home. Sometimes it was so loud we had to turn the satnav up to hear directions. Yes, I hate it but I used it, as the route from Glossop to the bookshop was not exactly direct.

Waiting for a group of 20 Guides now so will finish with a few photos and continue later.

Just discovered that the Guides cancelled yesterday by email. We got back late and I didn’t check my mail. Am still going to go as I need to feed chickens and stop swearing.

Will be back later with a more positive attitude.