A Tale of Two Cyclists

Second post of the day!

I’ve already written about the Ospreys, in an effort to catch up from last week, and now I’m going to write about bad weather and bicycles because that was the story of the morning.

On the way into town we came to the junction where a bus lane and two lanes of traffic squeeze into two lanes. It’s where I lost my mirror to a badly driven bus a few months ago. It’s also near where the town gallows used to stand and conveniently close to a cemetery. A couple of years ago I was caught on camera there and fined £30 for transferring to a bus lane five car lengths too early. All in all it’s a junction of ill-omen.

On the approach to the junction we had to stop when a cyclist pressed the button to stop traffic at a pedestrian crossing before riding across.

Highway Code Rule 79:  Do not ride across a pelican, puffin or zebra crossing.

Once across the road he proceeded to ride on the pavement, forcing several pedestrians out of his way.

Highway Code Rule 64: You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement.  (Their bold capitals, not mine).

Fortunately, just when this was in danger of becoming a discussion about the lawless ways of two-wheeled reprobates, we spotted a second cyclist.

He was struggling in the rain and traffic and just missed being clipped by a bus mirror as he pulled out of the bus lane in front of me. After stopping he failed to get his shoe clipped back on the pedal and lurched in front of a second bus. As an encore he then repeated the manoeuvre and lurched the other way. Fortunately I was far enough back for it not to be an issue.

I have seldom seen such fortitude displayed in the face of  adversity. In the old days he would have been leading a bayonet charge or discovering the source of an exotic river. Modern life is short on bayonets and undiscovered rivers, so it’s nice to see an area of everyday life where fortitude can still be displayed.

 

22 thoughts on “A Tale of Two Cyclists

  1. Laurie Graves

    Not many paths in Maine—how I wish there were more!—only roads. And it takes a lot of fortitude, or foolishness, to ride on the road with speeding cars. Still, we persevere. Clif and I try to stick to quiet roads.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
      1. Laurie Graves

        Compared to other places, Maine is quiet, so you weren’t completely mislead. However, almost everyone in Maine drives because there is little public transportation, and on rural roads they often drive very fast. And, it’s amazing how bikers can be invisible to drivers. This means bikers must really be alert. Now that Clif is retired, we go biking in the morning, when traffic is at its lightest.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. arlingwoman

    Did you make up those highway code numbers? I would have. In any event, this is the kind of guy I shout at when cycling myself “you give us all a bad name!!!” Often results in a flipped bird, but cycling is so awful on the roads I try to stay off as much as possible and stick to the paths. Still, it seems drivers, cyclists and pedestrians are all flouting rules and it would be so much better if we didn’t.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      It’s a dreadful junction, and when you see how the one riding on the road had so many near misses you can see why people do ride on the path.

      No, those numbers are proper Highway Code numbers – I looked them up. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. tootlepedal

    Keep resisting the temptation or I might have to detail the many, many cars and lorries that have not read the Highway Code on the distance needed when overtaking a cyclist. Many cyclists are pillocks though.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
      1. Lavinia Ross

        Quercus – you may want to check your SPAM filter. For some reason, I have randomly been thrown into there here and there. Same as of today with Tootlepedal, I think.

        Like

  4. Helen

    Whether walking, cycling or driving, whilst out and about there is a constant source of events which cause consternation. Today’s main highlight was a car doing 50 towards and round a parked lorry, blocking my right of way on an industrial estate at home time. Clearly, ‘arrive alive’ wasn’t top of this driver’s list.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  5. Lavinia Ross

    Sharing the road seems to be difficult for many, whether on bike, on foot or motorized vehicle, including motorcycles. I don’t walk the roads here because of the traffic, especially logging trucks. I would never consider riding a bike on these roads where I would be even more vulnerable. At least on foot I can jump over the guard rail, if necessary. And then there are those pedestrians and bikers who assume everyone else can see them, and get out of their way in time. And I have almost been run over by a speeding mountain bike while hiking. 🙂

    Like

    Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      Not all cyclists are bad, I admit. Just like not all car drivers or pedestrians are good. I do have a selection of stories on this subject, but am resisting temptation… 🙂

      Like

      Reply

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