Tag Archives: Numismatic Society

Brimming with Bonhomie

I’m absolutely full of it today. I enjoyed writing about the sweethearts yesterday, the boss is going away on a trip, and, when I returned home tonight, my anticoagulant results were in.

They were spot on target and I don’t have a retest until early December. This is a better way to live – free from the tyranny of medical tests – though it does mean that I tend to bleed a little too freely when I nick a finger tip in the kitchen.

I must improve my knife skills. Or make Julia do more of the cooking.

Last night we had a very enjoyable talk at the Numismatic Society.

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They weren’t big on portraits in the early days of coinage, but the production method didn’t really lend itself to quality work. This is  Edward I from a Canterbury Mint penny of 1272-1307. It could, however,  be any one of a number of Kings, or even Shrek

I grant you, Coins in the later Medieval Countryside is not a title calculated to cause rapturous outbursts of enthusiasm, even amongst the members of the Numismatic Society. There were a number of familiar faces missing, but as they are normally the ones who sit at the back and mutter it actually improved the evening.

The talk was mainly about the archaeology of the coins from Rendlesham in Suffolk, which seems to have been an active high-status estate in Anglo-Saxon and early Mediaeval times. It is close to Sutton Hoo, which is a lot more famous and, let’s face it, a lot more interesting.

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Long cross penny of Edward I – Lincoln Mint 1270

The project at Rendlesham has consisted, as far as the coins go, in using metal detectors in a scientific manner to search surrounding fields, and graph the types and frequency of coins, to give an idea of they way money was used. They have found over a thousand coins during the project and one of the questions coming out of the research is whether other sites could produce as many coins if they were worked in a similar intensive way.

Another equally important question, for me at least, was why did they never tell you there were jobs like this when I was at school? A job playing with coins, writing books and giving talks to numismatic societies – what more could you want?

Anyway, it’s time for me to go and practice my knife skills – roast veg with cumin served with steak and kidney pies and fruit crumble. As long as I don’t cut either of my typing fingers I should be OK.

Sorry about the photos – they are from an old post and could have been presented better. Unfortunately WP has been acting up again and I can’t work on them tonight.

Quick Post

We got stuck in traffic this morning and Number Two Son texted to say he’d seen us from the bus while he was on his way back from the night shift. Great use of technology!

Fourteen parcels to pack and a long slow queue at the post office. There was some light relief but I have no time to describe it.

A reasonable afternoon and some cooking.

A good talk at the Numismatic Society.

Chicken stew for tea. (Cooked earlier – good planning).

A fight with the new editor, which keeps throwing me out of the photographs.

Taking Number Two Son to work in the next few minutes.

I’m going to see what pictures it lets me use.

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Crocuses

The Coming Week

We have a talk on framework knitters on Monday night. It’s not a very numismatic subject but it’s a piece of Nottingham history and a subject I should know more about.

I like to think I’d have been a Luddite, but really I know I’d just have stayed home and muttered. Same goes for being a Cromwellian or a Chartist. It’s all very well being part of history, but I like a soft warm bed and an absence of shooting.

If history had relied on people like me we’d still have despotic Kings, cheap stockings and no vote. I’m not sure this would be a bad thing. We’re still ruled by privilege, we wear cheap Chinese socks and look where voting has got us.

Before that, we have 19 parcels to pack on Monday morning, so it’s looking like a busy day.

It may have occurred to you that there’s a distinct lack of Sunday in this post. That’s because Julia had the day off so we got up late, had a leisurely day, caught up on some work and noticed it was getting dark.  That’s how Sunday goes sometimes.

There’s a lack of Tuesday too, because I’m having trouble thinking that far ahead.

No doubt parcels will play a large point in the week.

I suppose I should have picked a different title.

We put the Isaac Newton medal on eBay a week ago, and it’s one of the things that is waiting to be packed tomorrow. It’s nice when a plan works. We have some things that have been on for two years, so it doesn’t always work.

 

Another 30 Minute Post

Once again the evening has been squandered with tea and biscuits and curry and poor quality TV. I regret the waste of time, when I have so many things to do, and I hadn’t planned on such a relaxing evening, but it’s been pleasant enough. The only problem is that I have to write a post in 30 minutes before taking Number Two Son to work.

If that seems familiar I can only apologise. I tried to write earlier but couldn’t find the enthusiasm.

Plans for the coming week include finishing the book I’m reading about William Dampier, reviewing a couple of other books and sending some more haibun off. The theory is that if I keep sending them off I will be forced to keep writing and improving. It seems sensible, but time will tell.

I’m also preparing a section of my collection for sale on eBay. It’s the part of my collection that I accumulated because it was cheap or included in lots with things I actually wanted. As such I really ought to call it my “collection” or my accumulation. When I’ve sold it I’m going to use it to buy more things. That’s the nice thing about collecting – you get to buy things for yourself on a constant basis.

It’s the Numismatic Society meeting on Monday. It’s comforting to get out and meet people with the same sorts of personality defects I have. I say “people”, but I mean middle-aged men. There is only one female member that I know of, and very few people under fifty.

And that’s it. Time’s up. I will now fill out the “Categories and Tags” and post for today. Only three days to go…

 

 

 

 

 

White Rajahs and Other Stories

Today started with a blood test. I aimed for ten past seven to avoid the arguments we had last time and arrived at 7.16. Instead of the machine there was a box of printed cards, which didn’t inspire confidence. I took card number 18.

On a brighter note, there were only a few people waiting and when they called for Number 15 I realised some people were waiting for other things.

The day started to look better.

After a swift test I was able to get home quickly enough to take Julia for breakfast and then get her to work on time.

They are hoping to get the ticket machine fixed tomorrow. Apparantly it was chaos on Monday when it broke.

Taking things back to Monday night, the main news is that I’m booked in for a tooth extraction next Tuesday and a blood test on Monday – it needs to be within 72 hours of the extraction, though I’m not quite sure how it helps. I’m on anti-coagulants so I’m going to bleed. You don’t hear about too many people bleeding to death from tooth extractions so I’m not too concerned. If the dentist wants to worry that’s up to him. Or her.

They rang to arrange that just as I was leaving home for the monthly meeting of the Nottinghamshire Numismatic Society. The subject was The White Rajahs of Sarawak, and was very good. It was reasonably entertaining and I learnt quite a lot of interesting stuff. One of them lost an eye in a hunting accident when in his 80s. He was known for being careful with his money so popped down to the local taxidermist (he was living in Devon in the days when towns had taxidermists) and bought a job lot of glass eyes. His favourite, it seems, was an Albatross eye.

If he’d been poor he’d have been regarded as an idiot, but as he was rich, with a private kingdom, he was merely eccentric.

 

 

Off out Tonight

I’m off out tonight, though you may already know that from the title.

We’re having a talk on the Medallic Miscelleny of Nottinghamshire at the Numismatic Society tonight and I’m breaking the habit of a lifetime by attending. I’ve been a member in the past, several times, but so far I’ve resisted the temptation to actually attend.

In principle I support the society, but in fact I’m not a very sociable person and have never been before. I can never raise the enthusiasm for leaving home on a winter night. There have been two meetings already this year and I have missed them both – one because we were away and one because it was the society auction, and I don’t buy coins.

Next month it’s the White Rajahs of Sarawak, which isn’t quite so gripping. January is short talks by members and February is a talk by someone from the Framework Knitters’ Museum. They could be interesting and it’s time I opened my mind to new experiences so watch this space.

March is Coins of the USA by the Boss, so I’ll remember who pays my wages and will be sitting there on the front row looking interesting (and employable).

Apart from that, the electrician came and found that the electrical fault had corrected itself, we had one customer, several people rang up and I had cheese and pickle sandwiches for lunch. The pickle wasn’t very good.

Senior moment of the day – I took my loose cap out and left it by the side of my chair as I ate breakfast (a large bowl of bran flakes, for those of you who are interested). I was half a mile away before I realised…