Frittering the Day Away

Today, as usual, I had such plans. But that was 14 hours ago and apart from cooking and washing up I have frittered the day away in watching TV and eating cake. And it was meant to be such a productive day . . .

My email system is playing up again, showing duplicate messages then going haywire when I try to access them. I’m not sure why it happens, but it was randomly done this since they had a major programme of “improvements” several years ago. I would change systems, but it would involve a lot of messing about changing the email addresses that I use for various things.

It’s the same sort of reason I avoid several necessary changes in my life, and is something I need to address this year. If we move in the next few years it will be forced on my anyway. Same with our landline – we are going to full fibre internet with BT and can save money by having the landline removed. As it is basically only used by nuisance callers, one of the neighbours and Julia’s older brother, that will be easy enough to change.

Eventually I suppose that if I use my mobile number more it will become infested with the verminous nuisance callers, but I will cope with that when the time comes. I will have to learn to use the call blocking feature and hope I have better luck than the time I tried to sort out my email spam problem. It did work, but it also cut out everyone using a gmail account, which was a touch inconvenient until I realised what I had done.

A local fox has been hitting the headlines recently – the video quality is poor but the content is awesome. And when I say “awesome” I mean it in the proper sense of inspiring awe, not the typical debased modern usage. Julia saw it on the news and passed the link on to me.

She also provided the header picture, which is Wollaton Hall, or Wayne Manor in the The Dark Knight Rises.

14 thoughts on “Frittering the Day Away

  1. Clare Pooley

    That fox is amazing, isn’t it? I saw it somewhere on the internet a few days ago and thought how practical animals are; we humans have so much to learn from them.
    We and all our neighbours were switched over to internet phone last spring. There was no opportunity to opt out. The main problem is that if and when we have powercuts (which happen regularly here) we have no phone and must rely on our mobiles – as long as we have remembered to keep them well charged. We also have problems with the internet; last Easter we were without WiFi for nearly two weeks. I wonder if BT thought this through properly.

    Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      I’m fairly sure they are thinking of their convenience rather than mine. My current internet is reliable and seems fast enough. The new set up will be faster – not sure why. Also not really sure where the idea of giving us no choice has come from. We just got a letter telling us we would have to change, then someone called unannounced to amke us sign up.

      Reply
      1. Clare Pooley

        Yes. hmmm… It all sounds so Orwellesque. We have a little flashing broadband box on our wall which is connected to the hub and our phone line. They’ll probably come back next year to install a new camera feature.

  2. tootlepedal

    Considering that we are supposed to be living in an age of innovation, it is surprising how conservative I feel when viewing the prospect of changing from a system with which I am familiar to a new one which ought to be more exciting. It only fills me with a dreadful feeling of boredom and inertia.

    Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      When I was younger I was happy to accept innovation (audio cassettes, automatic metering on cameras and pagers). I even adopted mobile phones, though not quite as easily. However, there is just too much now, and too many traps for the unwary.

      Reply

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