Curiosities…

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The medal in the picture is a British War Medal from the Great War. It isn’t rare – 6,500,000 were issued. Over the years many have been melted during booms in the silver price but there are still many survivors. It’s one of the commonest medals we see in the shop and, generally, they aren’t very interesting.

The cartwheel penny is also a common enough item (the first order was for 480 tons of this 1 ounce coin – over 15,000,000) and is often found cut about or counter-stamped like this one. Some people actually collect this sort of mutilated coin. It looks like someone has been trying to make it into a cogwheel. They have also stamped the name “Gosden” into it.

So, two common items, why the blog post?

Well, the medal is named to Private O G Gosden, and this is the first time I’ve ever seen a penny and a medal named to the same family name.

In addition, the Medal Index Card shows that he is only entitled to the one medal, which is unusual, as it usually came in a group. Normally this indicates that the recipient served in India, as part of the force sent there to replace the Indian troops that went to serve in France and the Middle East. In Gosden’s case his unit – the 10th Middlesex Regiment – sailed from Southampton on the “Royal George” 30th October 1914 and arrived in Bombay on 2nd December 1914. It stayed there until the end of the war.

I found no information on what he did during the war, but I do know he lived from 1879 to 1959, was a solicitor in civilian life and left over £120,000 when he died. There’s more information to find, but I’ll leave that to the purchaser as I don’t want to spoil the fun of researching it.

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6 thoughts on “Curiosities…

  1. Laurie Graves

    I wonder if we have similar medals over here. If so, then I am unaware of them. Your post movingly illustrates the person behind the medal.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. quercuscommunity Post author

      All the Allied countries gave a Victory Medal to their troops. They all had a rainbow ribbon and a depiction of “Victory” on them, though the details differ from country to country. The American one isn’t named but does have bars to show what battles the recipient fought in.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I_Victory_Medal_(United_States)

      America also various State medals. I have a few because I once collected a few to go with my British ones.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

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