Tag Archives: Lollards

Day 75

I had a lie in, an unhurried breakfast, watched a little TV and started clearing up bits and pieces of work I need to do on the computer. It’s amazing how half-finished thing accumulate, and how, after two hours, I don’t seem to have made much progress.

Lunch was the remains of the green salad with prawns and avocados, and I am now entering that phase of the day where the hypnotic sound of raindrops on glass is starting to work its Morpheotic magic. Well, I would if Morpheotic was a word. It should be, and it should mean “to do with Morpheus, the god of dreams”. Somehow it seems to have slipped through the net and searches for it come up with various medical conditions and a skin-tightening treatment. That’s the trouble with the English language, just not enough words. From what I see on that link, the Koreans are way ahead of us, and the Germans would soon run a word together that meant what I want, though it would probably be very long.

That is the trouble with computers. They offer the same hypnotic spell as a TV screen, added to the potential to procrastinate contained in Google and Wikipedia. This morning I looked up “Wickcliffe”. I always thought it was spelt “Wycliffe“. So does Wiki, though they do mention that it is also spelt Wyclif and Wickliffe. The people who struck a medal in 1924 to celebrate the 600th Anniversary of his birth selected “Wickliffe”. To be fair they also selected 1624 as his birthdate, which is not known with 100% accuracy. This sort of thing can be tricky when you get back into territory where spelling and record keeping had different standards from today.

I ended up on a journey through the Lollards, Tyndale and the Bible, to name but three. Exciting times, where failing to toe the party line in religious matters could end badly, as Sir John Oldcastle, the real life model for Falstaff, could demonstrate.

The problem was that I was supposed to be making a few background notes for the new medallion, not spending all morning refreshing my memory on the Reformation.

The John Wickliffe, if you are interested, was a sailing ship that took Scottish settlers to New Zealand in 1848.

This, if you are a researcher from the future looking at Procrastination in the 21st Century, or some similar subject for your dissertation, is what I do with my day.

Picture for today is coins. Even on my day off I am surrounded by coins.